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CANADA’S EARLY LEARNiNG AND CHiLD CARE CRiSiS

Updated: Mar 9, 2023

Introduction: Ontario was the most recent province to sign on to the national average $10/day early learning and child care deal - a plan for gradual fee cuts for child care spaces with a target to meet the $10/day average fee across- the-board by 2026. However, with record rises in cost-of-living forcing many Canadians to consider re- entering the labour force or work for longer hours, is the government moving quickly enough and providing enough for parents in covering their demand for child care at an affordable rate? What role do non-profit and for- profit child care providers each play in providing cheaper child care for parents at adequate quantities and qualities? Furthermore, is Canada underinvesting in the early childhood education that often goes hand-in- hand with child care spaces? Context: With costs of living rising, many parents are thinking about reentering the workforce to help pay the bills. But who will care for their young children? In early 2022 the Trudeau government announced a new budget plan that aims to cut childcare costs to just $10 per day by 2026 (Cecco 2022). The government estimates that this could save the average Ontatrio family $9000 per year compared to what they paid in 2019 for childcare with similar savings in Alberta ($8610) and British Columbia ($9390) (Canada 2022). First, this report will look at Quebec's experience with subsidized daycares, looking at the costs and benefits the province has incurred ...

CANADA’S EARLY LEARNiNG AND CHiLD CARE CRiSiS
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Author: Emily Downing



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